Framley Parsonage

Framley Parsonage

FRAMLEY PARSONAGE ANTHONY TROLLOPE TABLE OF CONTENTS I 'OMNES OMNIA BONA DICERE' II THE FRAMLEY SET AND THE CHALDICOTE SET III CHALDICOTES IV A MATTER OF CONSCIENCE V AMANTIUM IRAE AMORES INTEGRATIO VI MR HAROLD SMITH'S LECTURE VII SUNDAY MORNING VIII GATHERUM CASTLE IX THE VICAR'S RETURN X LUCY ROBARTS XI GRISELDA GRANTLY XII THE LITTLE BILL XIII DELICATE HINTS XIV MR CRAWLEY OF HOGGLESTOCK XV LADY LUFTON'S AMBASSADOR XVI MRS PODGERS' BABY XVII MRS PROUDIE'S CONVERSATSIONE XVIII THE NEW MINISTER'S PATRONAGE XIX MONEY DEALING XX HAROLD SMITH IN CABINET XXI WHY PUCK THE PONY WAS BEATEN XXII HOGGLESTOCK PARSONAGE XXIII THE TRIUMPH OF THE GIANTS XXIV MAGNA EST VERITAS XXV NON-IMPULSIVE XXVI IMPULSIVE XXVII SOUTH AUDLEY STREET XXVIII DR THORNE XXIX MISS DUNSTABLE AT HOME XXX THE GRANTLY TRIUMPH XXX1 SALMON FISHING IN NORWAY XXXII THE GOAT AND THE COMPASSES XXXIII CONSOLATION XXXIV LADY LUFTON IS TAKEN BY SURPRISE XXXV THE STORY OF KING COPHETUA XXXVI KIDNAPPING AT HOGGLESTOCK XXXVII MR SOWERBY WITHOUT COMPANY XXXVIII IS THERE CAUSE OR JUST IMPEDIMENT? XXXIX HOW TO WRITE A LOVE LETTER XL INTERNECINE XLI DON QUIXOTE XLII TOUCHING PITCH XLIII IS SHE NOT INSIGNIFICANT? XLIV THE PHILISTINES AT THE PARSONAGE XLV PALACE BLESSINGS XLVI LADY LUFTON'S REQUEST XLVII NEMESIS XLVIII HOW THEY WERE ALL MARRIED HAD TWO CHILDREN AND LIVED HAPPILY EVER AFTER CHAPTER I 'OMNES OMNIA BONA DICERE' When young Mark Robarts was leaving college his father might well declare that all men began to say all good things to him and to extol his fortune in that he had a son blessed with an excellent disposition. This father was a physician living at Exeter. He was a gentleman possessed of no private means but enjoying a lucrative practice which had enabled him to maintain and educate a family with all the advantages which money can give in this country. Mark was his eldest son and second child; and the first page or two of this narrative must be consumed in giving a catalogue of the good things which chance and conduct together had heaped upon this young man's head. His first step forward in life had arisen from his having been sent while still very young as a private pupil to the house of a clergyman who was an old friend and intimate friend of his father's. This clergyman had one other and only one other pupil--the young Lord Lufton; and between the two boys there had sprung up a close alliance. While they were both so placed Lady Lufton had visited her son and then invited young Robarts to pass his next holidays at Framley Court. This visit was made; and it ended in Mark going back to Exeter with a letter full of praise from the widowed peeress. She had been delighted she said in having such a companion for her son and expressed a hope that the boys might remain together during the course of their education. Dr Robarts was a man who thought much of the breath of peers and peeresses and was by no means inclined to throw away any advantage which might arise to his child from such a friendship. When therefore the young lord was sent to Harrow Mark Robarts went there also. That the lord and his friend often quarrelled and occasionally fought--the fact even that for a period of three months they never spoke to each other--by no means interfered with the doctor's hopes. Mark again and again stayed a fortnight at Framley Court and Lady Lufton always wrote about him in the highest terms. And then the lads went together to Oxford and here Mark's good fortune followed him consisting rather in the highly respectable manner in which he lived than in any wonderful career of collegiate success. His family was proud of him and the doctor was always ready to talk of him to his patients; not because he was a prize-man and had gotten a scholarship but on account of the excellence of his general conduct. He lived with the best set--he incurred no debts--he was fond of society but able to avoid low society--liked his glass of wine but was never known to be drunk; and above all things was one of the most popular men in the University. Then came the question of a profession for the young Hyperion and on this subject Dr Robarts was invited himself to go over to Framley Court to discuss the matter with Lady Lufton. Dr Robarts returned with a very strong conception that the Church was the profession best suited to his son. Lady Lufton had not sent for Dr Robarts all the way from Exeter for nothing. The living of Framley was in the gift of Lady Lufton's family and the next presentation would be in Lady Lufton's hands if it should fall vacant before the young lord was twenty-five years of age and in the young lord's hands if it should fall afterwards. But the mother and the heir consented to give a joint promise to Dr Robarts. Now as the present incumbent was over seventy and as the living was worth 900 pounds a year there could be no doubt as to the eligibility of the clerical profession. And I must further say that the dowager and the doctor were justified in their choice by the life and principles of the young man--as far as any father can be justified in choosing such a profession for his son and as far as any lay impropriator can be justified in making such a promise. Had Lady Lufton had a second son that second son would probably have had the living and no one would have thought it wrong;--certainly not if that second son had been such a one as Mark Robarts. Lady Lufton herself was a woman who thought much on religious matters and would by no means have been disposed to place any one in a living merely because such a one had been her son's friend. Her tendencies were High Church and she was enabled to perceive that those of young Mark Robarts ran in the same direction. She was very desirous that her son should make an associate of his clergyman and by this step she would ensure at any rate that. She was anxious that the parish vicar should be one with whom she could herself fully co-operate and was perhaps unconsciously wishful that he might in some measure be subject to her influence. Should she appoint an elder man this might probably not be the case to the same extent; and should her son have the gift it might probably not be the case at all. And therefore it was resolved that the living should be given to young Robarts. He took his degree--not with any brilliancy but quite in the manner that his father desired; he then travelled for eight or ten months with Lord Lufton and a college don and almost immediately after his return home was ordained. The living of Framley is in the diocese of Barchester; and seeing what were Mark's hopes with reference to that diocese it was by no means difficult to get him a curacy within it. But this curacy he was not allowed long to fill. He had not been in it above a twelvemonth when poor old Dr Stopford the then vicar of Framley was gathered to his fathers and the full fruition of his rich hopes fell upon his shoulders. But even yet more must be told of his good fortune before we can come to the actual incidents of our story. Lady Lufton who as I have said thought much of clerical matters did not carry her High Church principles so far as to advocate celibacy for the clergy. On the contrary she had an idea that a man could not be a good parish parson without a wife. So having given to her favourite a position in the world and an income sufficient for a gentleman's wants she set herself to work to find him a partner in those blessings. And here also as in other matters he fell in with the views of his patroness--not however that they were declared to him in that marked manner in which the affair of the living had been broached. Lady Lufton was much too highly gifted with woman's craft for that. She never told the young vicar that Miss Monsell accompanied her ladyship's married daughter to Framley Court ...