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Calavar

Calavar

Or the Knight of the Conquest, a Romance of Mexico

Published

Excerpt: ico, than the past? Hope speaks in the breath of fancy--time may, perhaps, teach us the lesson of mystery; and these magnificent climates, now given up, a second time, to the sway of man in his darkest mood,--to civilized savages and Christian pagans,--may be made the seats of peace and wisdom; and perhaps, if mankind should again descend into the gloom of the middle ages, their inhabitants will preserve, as did the more barbarous nations in all previous retrogressions, the brands from which to rekindle the torches of knowledge, and thus be made the engines of the reclamation of a world.'

The traveller muttered the conclusion of his speculations aloud, and, insensibly to himself, in the Spanish tongue, totally unconscious of the presence of a second person, until made aware of it by a voice exclaiming suddenly, as if in answer, and in the same language--

"Right! very right! pecador de mi! sinner that I am, that I should not have thought it, for the honour of God and my country!